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An eager (but relaxed) Josh Beckett thinks these Red Sox have great chance at 100 wins 02.15.11 at 1:32 pm ET
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FORT MYERS, Fla. — Not that the length of a press conference is an indication of what lies ahead, but Josh Beckett spoke for over 15 minutes Tuesday morning and joked about Mike Lowell‘s golf game, Terry Francona nailing him in the face during the “rag ball” fielding drill and 2010.

The fact that he could speak openly and frankly about that last part may be the most encouraging news of all for the Red Sox.

Beckett said his back is healthy and he is ready to put his nightmarish 2010 season behind.

“I can’t change last year.said Beckett, who was just 6-6 with a career-worst 5.78 ERA in 21 starts. “I just have to do the best I can this year. Like my dad said, just throw the rear view mirror away because you can’t change anything that’s already happened. As frustrating as 2010 was, I have to move on because this is 2011.”

Beckett missed two months after straining his lower back during a start on a wet Yankee Stadium mound last May 18. Beckett agreed with Francona that he likely tried to do too much when returning from the injury.

“We’re all guilty of that, from time to time, trying to do too much right now when really all you need to focus on is this start, not five starts from now, or two starts from now, or even two pitches from now,” Beckett said. “In that aspect, we’re all guilty of that at times, and yes, I think I was guilty of that sometimes.

“I’m trying to have the best 2011 I can and put this team in a position to do what I think we’re all capable of doing, and that’s winning another World Series.”

Just like the time in 2007, when he singlehandedly turned around the 2007 ALCS against the Indians and blew away the Rockies in Game 1 of the World Series. But something he’s never done is pitch for a team that’s won 100 games in season, something the Red Sox haven’t done since 1946.

“I’ve always wanted to been on a team that won 100 games,” Beckett said. “I don’t think I’m more determined, but I feel like this team has a chance to do something really, really special like that. I think that’s where some of the determination comes from. I’m not trying to change last year with 2011. I don’t want anybody to look back and say 2010 was pretty [crappy] but 2011 was really good so, oh, well. That’s not me. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2007 World Series, Boston Red Sox, jarrod saltalamacchia, Jason Varitek
Terry Francona takes stock of the Red Sox 02.13.11 at 3:09 pm ET
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FORT MYERS, Fla. — Red Sox manager Terry Francona held court with the media for the first time since arriving in spring training. He had spent the last two days huddled with team officials and coaches to formulate individual spring plans for the players in camp.

The Sox skipper welcomed the big expectations that exist for his club. One reporter noted that former Sox bench coach Brad Mills told Francona, after Boston’s active offseason, “Don’t [bleep] it up.”

“I actually had a few of those,” chuckled Francona. “One of them was from [GM Theo Epstein].”

Francona touched on a number of topics. Among them:

MEDICAL

–Francona said that the team would try to manage any concerns about outfielder J.D. Drew‘s hamstrings. The outfielder has been concerned enough to have received medical attention from Dr. James Andrews in Alabama as well as doctors in Boston about his discomfort, though Francona suggested that the concern was not a huge one.

“It’€™s something that he has voiced some concern about,” said Francona. “I don’€™t think he’€™s real concerned about it, but it’€™s been there. I don’€™t think we want it to be a concern, so we’€™ll certainly monitor it.”

–The team doesn’t feel that it will have to put restrictions on second baseman Dustin Pedroia in his return from a broken foot, but it will try to structure his work to prevent him from having to stretch his foot out.

“When he does his work, we need to probably not break it up in segments. We try not to do that anyway. When they go out and do their infield stuff, they put their gloves down and then go to hitting,” said Francona. “But we’€™d rather not beat up guys ‘€“ and a guy like Pedroia is a good example ‘€“ for no reason. We’€™ll keep an eye on him. For as much as he talks and he likes to talk, he’€™s pretty honest with me about stuff. So I’€™m not too worried about that. there’€™s a reason we like him as a player, but at the same time we realize what’€™s happened to him, and we’€™ll keep an eye on him.”

BULLPEN: PAPELBON AND THE SETUP GROUP

–The manager does not foresee an issue arising with the acquisition of Bobby Jenks, a closer-turned-setup man. Francona, does, however, believe that closer Jonathan Papelbon will be able to use both the disappointment of his down year in 2010 as well as his status as a free agent following the 2011 season as sources of motivation. Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: alfredo aceves, bobby jenks, Daniel Bard, dennys reyes
Jason Varitek doesn’t have to worry about Carl Crawford now 12.11.10 at 2:09 pm ET
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After Saturday’s press conference and the news that Jason Varitek will be coming back to Boston in 2011, the Red Sox captain doesn’t have to worry about throwing out Carl Crawford any more.

‘€œIn my opinion, he’€™s probably the most athletic player that’€™s in the game,” Varitek said. “Seeing him develop as a hitting, just being an athlete, playing more. Every year he just seems to get better. The dynamic, like Johnny Damon, his athleticism is his biggest attribute. Sometimes things happen at the plate that are so far against the book because he’€™s just an athlete. Him on the bases speaks for itself. Him running down balls speaks for itself. It’€™s a pretty interesting dynamic.’€

Crawford has been a living nightmare for Varitek and other Boston catchers, going 62-for-66 in his career in steal attempts against the Red Sox. Even the great catching coach Gary Tuck had reached his wits’ end with Crawford.

“I don’t think I’ve thrown him out. I was telling him this [Friday],” Varitek said. “Tuck and I call it a window. I get to throw a ball, boom. When I throw a ball, I know if a guy’s in that window, where’s he at, if he’s going to be safe or out. I know I’m going to get him, know it’s going to be close or I know I don’t have a chance. It’s just a certain area you vision.”

The game that haunts Varitek more than any other came on May 3, 2009 at Tropicana Field when Crawford was 6-for-6 against Varitek, tying the modern MLB record for steals in a game.

“There’s probably been three times that I’ve known I’ve thrown the ball on Carl and said, ‘I’ve got him. No, I don’t got ‘em.’ His acceleration the last 15-to-20 feet was the most different view. And I’ve seen Rickey [Henderson] slide into second. I’ve seen Ichiro [Suzuki] slide into second. I’ve seen some really good basestealers. But he was different. He’s almost accelerated to the bag more than any player from that view so it’s nice to have him.”

Turns out Varitek was underselling his skills against Crawford as he has thrown out Crawford before – once in 2004.

“Oh, I did? Good for me,” Varitek said in slamming his hand down on the conference table in celebration.

Read More: Boston Red Sox, carl crawford, gary tuck, Ichiro
Jason Varitek back with Red Sox: ‘Physically’ ready for a few more years at 12:35 pm ET
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Sporting the World Series championship ring from 2007, Jason Varitek sat comfortably Saturday in his seat at the end of a conference table in room off the EMC Club at Fenway Park, declaring that he’s is more than ready to return for the 2011 season.

‘€œIt’€™s awesome, it’€™s awesome,” said Varitek, who signed a one-year deal for $2 million, plus incentives. “Did I hope for it? Yes, I hoped for it and wished that it would happen. Did I necessarily this go-around, they may go in other directions? Yeah. I was excited I didn’€™t have to make that final decision.’€

What Varitek returns to is one of the best scenarios he could have hoped for with Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez on board.

“It’s like a tale of two different [scenarios],” Varitek said. “The [Red Sox] Nation wasn’t as happy as they are now with what’s gone on. To expect it, no. To expect us to win, yes and how much that takes to do that, you have to be in the right places. That gives us a chance but we still have big steps to take for this team to be good.”

But he admitted that between the end of the season and Saturday, this was the off-season he actually thought he might not return as captain as the Red Sox.

‘€œThis, more than any time in my career, I had probably the most interest from other teams and it was probably in the same regards that they have a need for the same and have a same type thing and it might not be here [in Boston],” said Varitek, who did not disclose the teams or how far along he was in the process.

‘€œYou don’€™t know what’€™s going to happen. You never know what’€™s going to happen with injuries, etcetera. So I have to prepare like I know how to prepare everyday to physically and mentally be ready to play every day. That’€™s not necessarily the case but physically that’€™s what I have to do.’€

A broken right foot limited Varitek to just 39 games in 2010, when he hit .232 and belted seven homers for the Red Sox as a back-up to Victor Martinez. He comes back in 2010 and actually could have a more prominent role on the team as he helps Jarrod Saltalamacchia learn the pitching staff.

‘€œGoing into this last one, I figured a few more years but I don’€™t know,” Varitek said. “At this point of my career it’€™s almost a year to year basis of seeing where I’€™m at but physically, I think it’€™s a few more years.’€

‘€œI’€™m excited,” Red Sox manager Terry Francona said. “I think ‘€˜Tek did an amazing job on the transition. That’€™s not an easy thing to do, to be like a stalwart. For many, many years be the captain, and then be asked to handle a reduced role, I think what Tek did, his role didn’€™t get reduced. He didn’€™t allow it to be.

“He picked it up in other areas, whether it was helping out the other catchers or his teammates, and as much as we appreciated, that’€™s why we appreciate it, because it’€™s not easy. He handled it with a lot of class and dignity. We’€™re actually thrilled he’€™s back. I think it’€™s easy to lose sight, because he got injured last year. but he was having a really productive year. this isn’€™t all about helping salty. This is about helping us win games. he’€™s going to catch.’€

Read More: adrian gonzalez, Boston Red Sox, carl crawford, jarrod saltalamacchia
Victor Martinez’ deal in context: Where his contract ranks in catching history 11.23.10 at 12:04 pm ET
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Former Red Sox catcher Victor Martinez appears poised to sign a four-year, $50 million deal with the Detroit Tigers. That would make him the fourth highest-paid catcher (in annual salary) of all time, with his average of $12.5 million per year falling just beneath the four-year deal to which Yankees catcher Jorge Posada is currently signed at $13.1 million per year and the $13 million per year that Mike Piazza earned from his seven-year deal with the Mets.

It is noteworthy that the Sox, according to a major league source, had a three-year, $36 million and four-year, $42 million offer on the table to Martinez. Both of those featured an average annual value in excess of the $10 million per year that the team paid to Jason Varitek over his four-year contract from 2005-08.

Here is a look at how Martinez stacks up against the biggest catching contracts of all time:

Joe Mauer, Twins: 8 years, $184 million ($21.75 million AAV)

Signed a long-term deal one year before free agency for ages 28-34 (2011-18)
Career stat line when signed (through 2009 season, before the final season of a previous contract): .327/.408/.483/.892, 72 HR, 397 RBI, 136 OPS+

Jorge Posada, Yankees: 4 years, $52.4 million ($13.1 million AAV)

Re-signed as a free agent for ages 36-39 (2008-11)
Career stat line when signed: .277/.381/.479/.860, 218 HR, 861 RBI, 124 OPS+

Mike Piazza, Mets: 7 years, $91 million ($13 million AAV)

Re-signed as a free agent for ages 30-36 (1999-2005)
Career stat line when signed: .333/.396/.575/.972, 200 HR, 644 RBI, 160 OPS+

Victor Martinez, Tigers: 4 years, $50 million ($12.5 million AAV)

Signed as a free agent for ages 32-35 (2011-14)
Career stat line when signed: .300/.369/.469/.838, 131 HR, 638 RBI, 121 OPS+

Jorge Posada, Yankees: 5 years, $51 million ($10.2 million AAV) plus club option

Signed before reaching free agency for ages 30-34 (2002-06)
Career stat line when signed: .268/.369/.465/.834, 85 HR, 326 RBI, 115 OPS+

Jason Varitek, Red Sox: 4 years, $40 million ($10 million AAV)

Re-signed as a free agent for ages 33-36 (2005-08)
Career stat line when signed: .271/.347/.451/.798, 97 HR, 418 RBI, 103 OPS+

Pudge Rodriguez, Tigers: 4 years, $40 million ($10 million AAV) plus club option

Signed as free agent for ages 32-35 (2004-07)
Career stat line when signed: .304/.344/.488/.832, 231 HR, 914 RBI, 113 OPS+

Jason Kendall, Pirates: 6 years, $60 million ($10 million AAV)

Signed before reaching free agency for ages 28-33 (2002-07)
Career stat line when signed: .314/.402/.456/.858, 45 HR, 265 RBI, 121 OPS+
(NOTE: Kendall’€™s career stat line is through the 2000 season; he signed the extension, which took effect in 2002, after the 2000 season, with one year left on a prior deal)

Read More: jason kendall, Jason Varitek, joe mauer, mike piazza
Red Sox prepare for life without Victor Martinez at 11:02 am ET
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As of Monday night, multiple major league sources said, the Red Sox recognized the likelihood that Victor Martinez was slipping away to the Detroit Tigers. It became clear that the catcher was not going to accept the Sox’ last offers of either three years at $36 million or four years and $42 million.

That scenario appears to have unfolded as of Tuesday morning. Ignacio Serrano reported from Venezuela that Martinez and the Tigers were closing in on a four-year, $50 million deal for the switch-hitting catcher. Serrano reported that the Red Sox talked to Martinez’ agent last night, and that the team was not willing to match the Tigers in years. Serrano also reported that the Orioles had a four-year, $48 million offer on the table, while the White Sox had a three-year, $48 million deal available.

Martinez ranked among the most productive catchers in the majors from the time that he joined the Sox at the 2009 trade deadline, following a deal that shipped Justin Masterson and prospects Nick Hagadone and Bryan Price to Cleveland in exchange for the four-time All-Star. Martinez hit .313/.368/.497/.865 in his time with the Red Sox, including a line of .302/.351/.493/.844 with 20 homers and 79 RBI in 2010.

Red Sox GM Theo Epstein said on multiple occasions this offseason that the team’s first choice for addressing its catching situation remained to re-sign Martinez. That said, he also suggested that the team was comfortable turning to 25-year-old Jarrod Saltalamacchia for the job.

For now, it appears the team is planning on trying to develop Saltalamacchia into an everyday player while signing another catcher to complement him. The team has also left open the possibility of re-signing free-agent Jason Varitek to partner with Saltalamacchia.

The Red Sox entered 2010 with some reservations about Martinez’ ability to remain a catcher long-term. (Indeed, at the time that the Indians traded him to Boston, they felt that his days as a catcher were already numbered.) At the start of the season, it seemed difficult to argue with such hesitation given that opposing teams were running wild on the catcher.

But he improved over the course of the season thanks to extensive work with bullpen coach and catching instructor Gary Tuck, and ended up throwing out 21 percent of would-be base stealers. Still, that was below the 26 percent American League average, and the Sox ended up allowing an AL-worst 80 percent success rate on stolen base attempts and an AL-worst 169 steals.

Perhaps as a result of such a performance, the Red Sox offered Martinez a two-year deal during the season. He told WEEI.com that he saw that as being too conservative given his age and performance.

“They came with something, and that might just be where the negotiations start, but I don’t see myself signing a two-year deal. I’m young enough. I work so hard and I give it all. I just want to be treated fair,” Martinez said. “It wasn’t hard because it was something I wasn’t expecting. I wasn’t expecting a two-year deal, anyway. I wasn’t expecting for them to come to me during the season anyways.”

The Sox remained engaged until at least last night in hopes of bringing Martinez back, but ultimately, the Tigers offer apparently proved to be one they did not want to match.

The Red Sox stand to receive a pair of draft picks with Martinez’ departure. Unless the Tigers sign outfielder Jayson Werth, the team would stand to receive Detroit’s first-round pick (No. 19 overall) as well as a sandwich-round draft pick. The Sox have, in the past, been able to leverage such draft pick compensation into important prospects. (More on that here.) Moreover, the No. 19 pick would be the earliest selection by the Sox since they took David Murphy with the No. 17 overall pick in 2003. Given the anticipated outstanding quality of the draft (and the fact that the Sox leveraged compensation picks in the last great draft, 2005, to acquire the likes of Clay Buchholz, Jacoby Ellsbury and Jed Lowrie), the Sox view the value of the draft picks as significant.

Read More: Detroit Tigers, jarrod saltalamacchia, Jason Varitek, victor martinez
Theo Epstein’s history of arbitration offers at 8:27 am ET
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The Red Sox have until Tuesday to decide whether to offer salary arbitration to their free agents. Of utmost interest is how the team will proceed with its four free agents who would entitle the club to draft pick compensation should they reject arbitration and sign elsewhere.

The team is virtually certain to offer arbitration to Type A free agents Victor Martinez and Adrian Beltre. Both have markets so robust that teams will be likely to sign them even if they must sacrifice a draft pick to do so. Thus, should they elect not to re-sign with the Sox, the Sox are likely to get a pair of draft picks (one from the team that signs them, and another as a compensatory sandwich pick from Major League Baseball).

The team is also likely to offer arbitration to Type B free agent Felipe Lopez, a player whom the club signed in the final days of the season specifically in hopes of offering him arbitration, having him turn it down and seeing him sign elsewhere. As a Type B free agent, a club that signs Lopez will not have to part with a pick; the Sox would, however, get a sandwich pick from MLB.

The biggest dilemma facing the club is whether to offer arbitration to Jason Varitek, a Type B free agent who could net the team a draft pick if he departs, but who might well be inclined to accept an arbitration offer in order to return to the Sox. (For more on the Varitek situation, click here.)

The Red Sox have made no secret of how much they value the draft picks that can be gleaned through free agent compensation. Under GM Theo Epstein, the team has been willing to risk overpaying players who might accept arbitration in order to secure a chance at a pick should the player sign elsewhere. Notable examples of that stance include Jason Varitek and Paul Byrd following the 2008 season and Tony Graffanino following the 2005 campaign.

That said, while the Sox have offered arbitration to all of their Type A and Type B free agents in the past three offseasons, the team has, at times, resisted making such offers for players. Indeed, between the 2003 and 2006 offseasons, the Sox declined to offer arbitration to several of their free agents. (Caveat: it is worth noting that, whereas Type B free agents no longer require a signing club to part with a draft pick, until 2006, a team that signed a Type B free agent needed to part with a second-round pick.)

Most notably, the team declined to offer arbitration to Trot Nixon and Mark Loretta after the 2006 season, and to Kevin Millar after the 2005 campaign.

Here is a look at how the Sox have proceeded since the 2002-03 offseason under Epstein with regards to free agents who could net the team draft pick compensation.

Read More: Adrian Beltre, arbitration, felipe lopez, Jason Varitek
John Farrell on D&H: Players would ‘run through a wall’ for Terry Francona 11.10.10 at 12:56 pm ET
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Former Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell joined the Dale & Holley show on Wednesday to talk about his new stint as Blue Jays manager, and how he plans to use free agency in organizing his new clubhouse. To hear the full interview, go to the Dale & Holley audio on demand page.

Farrell was drawn to the Blue Jays job because of the strengths of the team, its core group of young players, and the attraction of competing in the American League East. ‘€œI think it is the strongest division in baseball,’€ Farrell said, ‘€œand to go up against those teams a third of the time, between New York, Boston and Tampa, that’€™s a challenge that was relished, not run away from.’€

A smaller payroll than some of those other AL East teams is something that Farrell is unconcerned about when it comes to working with the Blue Jays. While payrolls may differ around the league, each team still has the ability and opportunity to go out and compete for a World Series. ‘€œI think what it comes down to is just a team, an organization working in unison to be as efficient as possible,” Farrell said.

The first step to Farrell forming that kind of team was to get his staffing situation figured out. He said that as a person who has never managed, it was important to him to have someone who had that experience, and also that ‘€œto have someone that I had a standing relationship with.’€ So, Farrell dug into the Red Sox’€™ minor league staff pool and hired former Pawtucket manager Torey Lovullo as his first-base coach.

Asked what he takes from his time alongside Terry Francona, Farrell said: “The thing that really stood out with Tito was his willingness to listen and, without a doubt, his unwavering confidence in players. He never backed off, even when a guy was struggling. So, players felt that belief in them and really that he had their back though thick and thin. ‘€¦ When guys went through some times where things weren’t going well, he never backed off them. I really feel like they believed in him and would run through a wall for him.”

It’€™s possible that Farrell could look back to his familiarity with the Red Sox organization when it comes to free agency. Farrell did not deny that there are questions on the Blue Jays roster, including at the catching position, which could lead to a pursuit of Jason Varitek. ‘€œWe all know what Jason is about,’€ Farrell said. ‘€œHe’€™s a great leader in the clubhouse and on the field. ‘€¦ We’€™ve got a young catcher in J.P. Arencibia that still needs some development and grooming to become an everyday guy.’€

The bullpen is another area of the roster Farrell said needs to be address, and though he agreed that Cliff Lee is probably the most desirable guy on the free agent list, that doesn’€™t mean the Blue Jays will make a bid. ‘€œWhether or not he fits what we’€™ve got going currently, that will be determined here as we go deeper into the offseason,” Farrell said. “But I’€™m sure there’€™s going to be some heavy pursuit for Cliff.’€

Read More: Cliff Lee, Jason Varitek, John Farrell, torey lovullo
Terry Francona on D&H: ‘Tek’s true colors really showed’ 10.07.10 at 2:59 pm ET
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Red Sox manager Terry Francona made his last appearance of the season on the Dale & Holley show Thursday afternoon after being delayed one day due to the Randy Moss trade coverage. Francona talked about his thoughts on the trade, as well as ESPN’s 30-for-30 show about the Red Sox’ 2004 World Series run, and the start to his baseball offseason.

“I’m having knee surgery on Wednesday,” Francona said. “Next time you guys see me, I’m going to be 6-foot-1 and not bow-legged. I’m going to get that extra half-inch back, and I’m going to have to buy some new jeans.”

Following are highlights from the conversation. To listen to the interview, check out the Dale & Holley audio on demand page.

What did you think of the Randy Moss trade?

I don’t know. I don’t know. I’m sure there’s a lot going on in those walls that we’re not privy to that would be really interesting.

How do you handle personalities on the team, especially ones that become agitated or irritated?

Well, it’s not just how to handle it ‘€” sometimes I’m not sure you do. I think what you have to figure out is when does the production better outweigh the amount of headaches. When that stops happening, then I think teams start looking at different ways to look things.

Is there one thing that you can’t get past, in terms of player’s attitudes?

That doesn’t happen too much here. There are some things that probably aren’t very serious, you know. Go back to Jay Payton. Jay didn’t want to be here. We had a little episode in the dugout where it got a little loud, and so we kind of had to back up, you know, what I said. Don’t want to happen very often. That puts me in a tough spot, and I don’t like doing that. Since then, Jay and I have talked a couple of times, so that’s OK.

Again, when you get emotional during a game, you try not to say things that you either don’t mean or you have to carry out on, you know. You try to stay a little even-keeled and make good decisions not based on emotion, because that’s where you make mistakes.

Is it safe to say that one of the jobs of a manager is to praise publicly and criticize privately?

I agree with that. I don’t know that everybody does, everybody has their own style. Again, if we have a message to deliver that’s maybe not going to be real popular, we do it behind closed doors. That’s how I would like to be treated. I wouldn’t want to be embarrassed in front of the public. I think players just like to know that the manager kind of has their back. That doesn’t mean we don’t talk to them, and they all know that. But we don’t need to do it through the media.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: daniel nava, darnell mcdonald, Jason Varitek, Kevin Millar
Was that it for Jason Varitek in Boston? 10.04.10 at 9:17 am ET
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[Click here to listen to Jason Varitek talk about potentially his final day in a Red Sox uniform.]

[Click here to listen to GM Theo Epstein talk about Varitek.]

[Click here to listen to how manager Terry Francona decided to pay tribute to Varitek.]

Jason Varitek has never been one to speak about his own accomplishments that much. But what his bosses said following the 2010 season finale spoke volumes about what he has meant to the team, organization and city of Boston since the Red Sox aquired him and Derek Lowe for Heathcliff Slocumb at the trade deadline in 1997.

“I don’t think anyone deserves that kind of reception from the fans more than he does.” Red Sox general manager Theo Epstein said of the captain. “No matter happens going forward, he’s a Red Sox more than anyone one of us, he’s a Red Sox.”

Then, without stopping Epstein, continued and acknowledged why the fans were giving him a standing ovation before his eighth-inning flyout to deep right center and his coming off the field before the top of the ninth began.

“The future is uncertain,” Epstein said. “Although warmth the fans showed, his teammates showed may have seemed like a goodbye, it doesn’t necessarily have to be that way.”

Indeed, the Red Sox have a huge question facing them heading into 2011. Do they make an offer to Jason Varitek, similar to the one he just finished out, two years, $8 million?

There’s one big reason they would.

If Victor Martinez, who sounded after Sunday’s game like he was very much looking forward to free agency, doesn’t return, who’s going to catch for the Red Sox?

Jarrod Saltalamacchia? Dustin Brown? Kevin Cash?

Or Jason Varitek?

‘€œI just have to be patient and see what happens,” Varitek said in acknowledging his uncertain future. “There are a lot of things that have to be decided here. It’€™s not like there are one or two moving parts. There’€™s a lot of things to be decided.

“I don’t know if I can really answer that. All I can be is appreciative of being here. My time here, my teammates, the organization and importantly, the fans. I’ve said it, my kinds have grown up here. My oldest is 10 and I’ve been here 13 years. This is a part of them, too.” Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2004 ALCS, 2004 World Series, 2007 World Series, Boston Red Sox
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